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39 entries from May 2006

Links for 2006-06-01


Brief foodie lingo reference from Nancy Leson

The Seattle Times: Food & wine: Say what? A guide to menu-speak



Doris Mathews was not amused when she called to complain about one of my reviews: the one where I praised the chef’s amuse-bouche and dissed his panna cotta. “Say what?” she exclaimed, explaining how she had pulled out her dictionary and—even then—had no idea what I was talking about.

Menu-speak. It’s a foreign language: literally and figuratively. And Doris—an 80-year-old former home-ec major—holds no truck with high-falutin’ food jabber. Neither does my friend Mariann Grady.

Last winter, Mariann, a self-described meat-and-potatoes gal and the most elegant woman in Palatine, Ill., joined me for dinner at Chicago’s four-star Ambria. There, in a warmly lit room tended to by a fabulous fleet of fine-dining personnel, we were offered menus, cocktails and—hello, Doris!—amuse-bouche.

“I am so out of my element,” whispered Mariann, whose venison-in-the-headlights expression made that all too clear. “Don’t worry,” I told her, “I am so very much in mine.”

Taking me at my word, I soon had her paying homage to a gorgeous filet of Columbia River sturgeon à la plancha with braised oxtail lentils du puy and leek fondue. Yes, she loved it, though pointing to the tiny black orbs garnishing her sturgeon, she wondered, “What’s this?” Taking my fork to her fish, I rendered a verdict: “Tapioca pearls dyed with squid ink.”

A helping of help
Don’t know your ponzu from your yuzu or your burrata from your bottarga? Here’s a handy handful of food reference books to set you straight:

“The New Food Lover’s Companion (Third Edition),” by Sharon Tyler Herbst (Barron’s)

“The Oxford Companion to Food,” by Alan Davidson (Oxford University Press)

“Larousse Gastronomique,” edited by Prosper Montagne (Clarkson N. Potter)

“The Dictionary of Italian Food and Drink,” by John Mariani (Broadway Books)

“Field Guide to Meat,” “Field Guide to Produce,” by Aliza Green (Quirk)

“Pocket Dictionary of Ethnic Foods,” by Daniel G. Blum (Word Craft Publishing)

“Eating Your Words,” by William Grimes (Oxford)
At once fascinated, horrified and amazed, Mariann was duly impressed when my guess proved correct. As, apparently, was our waiter. “We call it ‘faux caviar,’” he told us. “And no one, I mean no one has any idea what it’s made of.”

Feigning modesty and keeping mum regarding my profession, I answered: “I eat out a lot.”

For those of you who don’t, but who want to be up with the latest menu-speak when you do, here’s a little lexicon: a culinary cheat sheet describing common “whatzats?” found on menus all over town.

Amuse-bouche (aka amuse-gueule)

French for “mouth amuser,” an amuse-bouche is something to tantalize your taste buds: a little nosh often presented as “a gift from the chef” before the start of a meal. At Veil, Shannon Galusha woos his guests with the likes of tuna tartare moistened with parsley oil, or prosciutto crisps served with a mouthful of lentil salad.

Beluga lentils

When cooked, these tiny black legumes look much like Beluga caviar (which, by the way, comes from a sturgeon, not a whale). Also known as black lentils, they keep their “bite” better than the more easily overcooked common brown lentils, texturally enhancing salads and side dishes. And at Carmelita, they play sassy side to Kevin Fogarty’s savory Five Vegetables in Crust.

Burrata

Fresh buffalo-milk mozzarella takes a tantalizing turn as burrata: scraps of mozzarella and cream wrapped in a precious package of pulled curd. When sliced, the creaminess is next to godliness. Especially when served with heirloom tomatoes, fresh basil and Umbrian olive oil, as Walter Pisano does at Tulio.

Confit

Though goose and duck define the classic confit, the word is used to describe most any meat cooked in its own fat, stored in a pot and covered in the same fat for preservation purposes. That said, “confit” also describes cooked fruits or vegetables that have reached a jamlike consistency. At Pair, Felix Penn’s duck confit comes paired with blood orange, radicchio and nappa cabbage, while at the Harvest Vine, Joseba Jimenez de Jimenez’s tapas menu might offer clams simmered with onion confit.

Day-boat scallops/Diver’s scallops

Commercial trawlers regularly spend many days at sea to secure a full load of scallops, often using preservatives to keep their shucked catch “fresh.” Day-boat scallops, by contrast, are harvested and unloaded daily, which brings the sweet catch swiftly from sea to table. Pristine diver’s scallops are harvested by hand and come anchored to the plate with celery-root puree at Rover’s as part of Thierry Rautureau’s multicourse menu degustation.

Guanciale

Salted, cured and hung to air-dry, guanciale is made from pig’s jowl and cheek and used like pancetta (Italian bacon). At La Medusa, chefs Julie Andres and Earl Hook thin-slice Armandino Batali’s guanciale and layer it over the crisp skin of paprika-roasted chicken till it melts like butter.

Hanger steak

A staple in French bistros where it’s known as onglet, this hanging tender—a flap of beef that supports a steer’s diaphragm—has made its mark in Seattle thanks to its chewy-good texture and gamey “here’s the beef” taste. At Restaurant Zoë, Scott Staples pairs Kobe beef hanger steak with braised beef cheek, smokes the meat and scents it with rosemary.

Kurobuta pork

Kurobuta (black pig), beloved in Japan, dates back hundreds of years to the Shire of Berks, in England, hence its Anglo name: Berkshire pork. Now raised in the U.S.—where pork producers have sadly engineered the flavor out their product—kurobuta’s beloved oinkiness is catching on locally. Catch it at Madoka on Bainbridge, where Alvin Binuya’s apple-wood-smoked pork chop proves that point.

Mâche (aka lamb’s lettuce, field salad, corn salad)

A tender winter salad green widely cultivated in Europe, this plant has bright-green leaves that grow in pretty posies and make a glorious salad. Those leaves are said to resemble lamb’s tongues, hence the alternate name lamb’s lettuce—one of many. At Café Juanita, Holly Smith grows her own.

Marcona almonds

The cuisine of Spain is the hottest thing since, well, Marcona almonds. The plump Spanish nut is famous for its creamy texture. Found fried, salted and available by the little tubful at specialty markets everywhere, it’s also a favorite among chefs like Maria Hines at Earth & Ocean, who pairs Marconas with baby lettuces tossed with mustard vinaigrette.

Paddlefish caviar

For those with Champagne tastes and Freixenet pockets, this American caviar does a convincing country-cousin impression of Caspian sevruga—at a fraction of the cost. When pulled from Montana’s Yellowstone River, this is one ugly fish (one also known as a spoonbill) that looks much prettier in its undeveloped stage, garnishing everything from John Sundstrom’s rosti potatoes at Lark to Jerry Traunfeld’s chive flan at the Herbfarm.

Panna cotta

Italian for “cooked cream,” panna cotta is an eggless custard served chilled and often gussied up with fresh berries. Chefs like Philip Mihalski at Nell’s tweak the classic recipe to create buttermilk Meyer lemon panna cotta served with lemon tuile (a crisp lacy cookie).

Saba

Order saba at a Japanese restaurant and you’ll soon be eating mackerel. But there’s nothing fishy about the saba-glazed bacon served at Fork or the saba-kissed vegetables at Sitka and Spruce. That sweet Italian condiment, with a flavor reminiscent of pomegranate molasses, is made from a careful reduction of concentrated fresh grape juice.

Squid ink

Jet-black and Halloween-scary, squid ink is the substance extracted from the “ink sac” of an ocean squid or its relative, the cuttlefish. Those cephalopods use their ink as a defense mechanism against predators. Tamara Murphy uses it to add color—and an earthy flavor—to a wonderful teeth-staining risotto at Brasa.

Togarashi

The small, hot, red Japanese chilies are available fresh but widely used in dried form and combined with ingredients like seaweed, sesame seeds and orange peel (among others). Though used primarily as a table condiment, Red Fin’s Drew Watson employs it to fire up his togarashi-seared day-boat scallops with buckwheat soba noodles, mango and soy vinaigrette.

Wagyu beef

This breed of Japanese cattle offers meat that’s highly prized (and highly priced) due to its rich flavor and intense marbling. When raised in Japan’s Kobe region, Wagyu is sold under the name Kobe beef. Wagyu cattle raised in the U.S. don’t get the beer diet or stress-relieving massage that traditional Kobe Beef famously receives. Overheard while dining at Canlis: “Wagyu give me this luscious slice of Wagyu rib-eye?”

“Because it’s so rich, I can’t eat another bite.”

Links for 2006-05-31


Links for 2006-05-26


Memory lapses

Twice in the last three months I have returned home from a full day out of the house to find my garage door wide open. Both times I also hadn’t locked the door from the garage to the house, because I’ve always been fairly blasé about that too.

The first time this happened was back in March when my friend Matt was in town. It was a Friday, I took some time away from work and we spent the day in downtown Seattle and across the Sound on the Kitsap Peninsula, and when we got back to my place that evening I saw as we pulled into the back parking area where my garage access is that the door was wide open. That morning I hadn’t looked in my rear-view mirror to check the door was closing as we pulled away, but I didn’t think much of it until we got to the basement door and it was unlocked.

I did the same thing today. I left for work at 07:49. The usual routine: Opened the garage door as I stepped through the basement door; started the car; pulled out of the garage; hit the transmitter button to cycle the door opener through closing. But the thing that gets me: I have a clear memory of seeing the door start down its track as I pulled away.

I worked in blissful ignorance all day, not even a hint in my mind of any problem anywhere. When I left work I took the freeway (it was nearly 19:00, traffic mostly dissipated) so I approached the house from the north. When I got home and pressed the door-opener button as I rounded the building, I saw as the door came into view that it was headed down its track—immediately I remembered I hadn’t locked the basement door. I thought, oh shit, what if someone saw that door open all day and decided to test the basement door and swipe my life? What if I hadn’t closed the basement door all the way and the cats were running loose somewhere? They’re indoor cats, they haven’t been outside since I got them back in September 2004 except in their cat carriers. And one time when Flex bolted in Salt Lake City.

I’ve never backed into my garage quite so recklessly as I did at that moment, happily without scrapes on the Escape and no dings to the building, and when I sprinted into the house to find the cats lounging on the living-room floor in their simultaneously calm and blissful following-the-sun way, I knew everything was all right. But I still had to trek through the house to make sure my computer and my backpack and my personal files and whatnot were all intact and untouched.

It was all good. But now I’ll be making a point of locking the basement door every time I leave and behind me every time I arrive home through the garage.

And this morning I actually watched the garage door make its entire transit down the track to fully closed. So if I get home tonight and the door closes in response to my opener trigger, I’m gonna be mildly freaked out.


By the numbers

For an EDD development-process-from-hell ongoing since October 2005, but light at the end of the tunnel now in sight:

  • 268 — Message count in the “here’s the newest problem” email thread
  • 49 — Message count for the last two days in the same thread
  • 9 — Relevant voice-mail messages since May 09
  • 160 — Data-format specifications and instruction sets we’re required to match, on top of (and in some cases directly contradicting) the EDD specification
  • 440 — Data elements possible in each sample record
  • 7,834 — Total number of XML files generated through testing phases
  • 92% — Average compression of XML files in ZIP archives for transmission via email (gotta love when 2MB files reliably compress to about 170KB)
  • 4 — Days to my self-imposed deadline for getting this silly process over with

Links for 2006-05-20


Cramp

Weird experience this morning.

Shaving in the shower as I usually do. Turned head to left and tightened jaw muscles to stretch skin on right side of face for closer shave with fewer scrapes blah blah blah.

Started shaving stroke when muscles along left side of jaw and neck cramped heinously. It was all I could do to keep my head upright as I fought it until the muscles relaxed. My tongue felt about five times its normal size the whole time.

Now, several hours later, every time I turn my head to the left or tighten my jaw at all, the left side of my neck twinges a bit, like the tightness just before cramping.


Links for 2006-05-19


Friday 14:30? Time for randomness!

I thought 30 Boxes was kinda cool as online calendar services go. It let me create events using natural-language parsing, very simple.

A few weeks after I tried 30 Boxes, I found Google Calendar. I haven’t used 30 Boxes since.

If either of these services ever offers two-way synchronization with Mac OS-based calendar applications, I’ll be all over it. I hope Google’s service reaches that milestone first, in all honesty, because I like Google Calendar’s interface much better than 30 Boxes’.

:: • :: • :: • :: • ::

On our way back from lunch today, Katharine and I stopped at a Woodinville filling station for liquid refreshment. While Katharine was in there, she spotted something she’d been seeking for a few weeks now:

Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups with CaramelReese’s Peanut Butter Cups with Caramel.

She first mentioned these to me a couple weeks ago and I didn’t believe her. Who would think a peanut butter cup needed caramel? Isn’t that just a Snickers bar shaped differently and with the nuts pulverized?

But no, it is a real product. I’ve a package on my desk waiting to be tried at some point, because I am curious about it, but also... urk.

But they do offer 2% of the recommended daily calcium intake according to the nutrition information panel’s 2,000-calorie-diet standard.

:: • :: • :: • :: • ::

I didn’t realize Reese’s and Hershey had joined way back in the 1960s. Somehow I thought that was a recent (i.e., within the last 10 or 20 years) development.

:: • :: • :: • :: • ::

Speaking of Google Maps: Why is it not possible to turn off the little instructional blurb when you first load the site, to expand the map to full screen width? I’ve used Google Maps for months now, I get it. I don’t need the blurbs, so let me turn ’em off. Particularly if I’m signed in with a Google account for search history and whatnot.

And let me save locations, the way Yahoo! Maps does. That would rock.

:: • :: • :: • :: • ::

And speaking of nutrition information, it annoys me that the Nutrition Facts panels leave out the hyphen in the little “Percent Daily Values (DV) are based on a 2,000 calorie diet” blurb. Copy-editing is a rapidly dying art, I fear.

:: • :: • :: • :: • ::

At lunch we were seated in a booth next to a fundie couple who prayed about everything. The woman announced shortly after they were seated how today she was going on Atkins, and the man said he knew she was starting Atkins soon but he didn’t know it was today. She’d told him she was starting it today, for cryin’ out loud, and he offered a quick prayer asking Heavenly Father’s forgiveness for his oversight. Then he changed their order to mainly veggies and rice with a bit of chicken, after which they prayed at length, an offering of thanks for the pending meal.

“Heavenly Father,” hmm. Maybe they were LDS.

Anyway. When their meal was served, they prayed again, yet more thanks for the bounteous spread laid out before them etc. After the praying stopped and the clink of utensils began, the few bits of conversation I overheard (I was on the side of the booth that backed theirs) centered around the prayers they had offered or were offering or would be offering for various family members and friends and business associates, to seek guidance from Heavenly Father for what actions to take on the events of their lives.

I’m not religious and haven’t been for, oh, 20 years or more. When I was a churchgoer, it was the religious observance of a child who goes to church solely because that’s what his parents require each week. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Salt Lake City
St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Salt Lake City
Sure, I liked the lessons—the stories were engaging and they taught us, all unknowing, about many of the moral and ethical standards of our society. The congregation was friendly, my dad was a member of the lay committees, and the church itself was a fascinating building, full of small spaces and out-of-the-way corners to be explored. Also the little post-services social hour was fun, and sometimes after church we walked a block down 900 E to Village Inn, always the highlight of the day what with the little smiley-face pancakes.

So with my always limited reliance on religion, I can’t imagine why people are willing to surrender their free will to something called “faith” so thoroughly that they must pray to a deity or higher power (or whatever phrasing one prefers) in order to determine their course of action on nearly everything in their lives.

:: • :: • :: • :: • ::

I just received an email from the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation informing me of changes to their requirements data reporting.

I still want to take a cruise to Alaska at some point in my life, but in every other way the state of Alaska is a thorn in my side.

:: • :: • :: • :: • ::

We’re back to the cycle of beautiful weather on weekdays, with clouds, cooler temps, and occasional rain for the weekends. Because of course we can’t have the beauty on the weekends when we aren’t chained to our desks.

Blargh.

:: • :: • :: • :: • ::

MacBook in black with glossy displayI thought Apple’s new MacBook was pretty cool in black until I saw the $200 price premium for that color. And the glossy screen annoys me; I much prefer the matte screens of my PowerBook and my Dell monitor at work.

Anyway, I was glancing through the various hardware specs when for kix I fired up the Apple Store and configured an absurd Power Mac system, the lone holdout of the PowerPC architecture:

  • Quad-core 2.5GHz Power Mac with 16GB RAM(!), 2 500GB hard drives
  • Dual 30-inch monitors (8,192,000 pixels combined)
  • 7TB RAID (1.6 million songs—the ultimate iPod!)

All for the bargain price of $42,000 and change (with free shipping).

Yeah, I’m insane.


Seattle monorail looks to the opera for new doors

I haven’t attended a Seattle Opera production so I had no idea their craftspeople could do anything close to this type of work:

The Seattle Times: Unlikely monorail-door maker: the opera



Michael Moore leans on a wood and plastic prototype of one of nine doors the Seattle Opera set design team has been hired to construct for the Seattle monorail.

When managers of Seattle’s mangled monorail wanted nine new doors in a hurry, they didn’t hire the big-time manufacturer from Europe. They called the Seattle Opera.

The decision saved three to six months—allowing the city to stick to its plan to restart the 1-mile line before the Bumbershoot festival at Seattle Center begins Sept. 2.

A single malfunctioning traffic light

I pulled out of my house this morning with the radio set, as usual, to KOMO 1000 for traffic reports and news updates. I’d gone about a mile when I encountered what to this point has been the worst traffic back-up in the year and three months I’ve lived in Mill Creek.

Traffic along southbound SR 527 was moving at a crawl from just south of 164th St SE to a bit south of the Thrashers Corner area, where a single malfunctioning traffic light (they didn’t say exactly which signal) was backing up traffic at least a couple miles in every direction.

That meant a hell of a lot of people were bailing on the main highway to thread their way through back routes, which in turn meant my usual (and regular daily) route, a left at 180th to 35th Ave SE and a right at 35th and on down, was also stacked to heaven’s basement. I continued straight along 180th to SR 9 instead, turned right on 9 to Maltby Rd, and left on Maltby to Yew Way and its southbound SR 522 access. Finally hopped off SR 522 at the SR 202/Woodinville exit and turned right to get through the residential and business areas just south of the laboratory’s business park.

(Would that Google Maps allowed multiple-point routing similar to Yahoo! Maps’ beta—although the Y! Maps beta doesn’t want to play nicely with this route this morning, it doesn’t like the route numbers on these state highways. Blargh.)

I made a grand circle tour of the rural Bothell, Snohomish, Monroe, and Woodinville areas, an hour-long drive to cover a distance that normally takes no more than 20 minutes in the regularly increasing traffic levels around here.

The KOMO traffic guy commented several times on the miles of back-ups caused by the traffic-light outage south of Thrashers Corner, but he never said anything about cops on the scene directing traffic or any other measures they may have been taking to alleviate the problem. If they did nothing, it would have been 09:30 or later before the back-ups began to clear, presuming the traffic signal either reset itself and began functioning normally or it was reset by DOT crews or whatever.

Damn. Today I really wish I’d bought a bike in January.


A full rich weekend

Finally arrived at the middle of May, which heralded two events:

Cirque du Soleil: VarekaiVarekai was, as usual, amazing. Visually arresting in the usual Cirque du Soleil manner, the music and singing were spectacular too, and nothing holds a candle to their physical performances. They had some aerial performers (the ones who swing this way and that while attached to ropes) who were just unbelievable. It’s too bad they don’t put out programs so we can find out who the performers are.

They’d set up the tents at the northeast corner of Marymoor, with parking areas on the large lawns surrounding the fenced-off Cirque area. We had no trouble getting in before the show but as usual the after-show traffic control kinda bit, took us about half an hour to get out of the lot and onto W Lake Sammamish Pkwy.

We had dinner at Bellevue Square after the show. We were in Dave’s F-350, which sports four doors and a full-length bed and is 6' 8" tall. Made for some Big Laffs! in the Bellevue Square parking lot, which lists its clearance at 6' 10"—Julie Anne was freaked out much of the time as we drove through the lot, and actually took me seriously when I said we should all roll down our windows so if the truck’s roof smashed down, we could avoid being sprayed by shattering glass.

Seattle Cheese Festival logoThe Cheese Festival brought together something like 250 different cheese along Pike Place. Throngs of people everywhere, most of them moving at a rate of about one foot per week. I bought some natural cream cheese that was just absurdly good, but of course I don’t remember the name of the cheesemaker right now. I’ll have to open the fridge later and take a look.

They had a wine garden set up in a series of large pavilion-style tents strung together, but we didn’t try that. It was even more wall-to-wall people under those tents than in the open air. After we’d sampled perhaps three dozen cheese and wandered through Beecher’s (was difficult not to grab a couple packages of their insanely good mac’n’cheese), we were done and it was time to thread our way out of the throngs and back to the parking garage.

Absolutely beautiful days this weekend. It was a bit breezy today so it felt cooler than yesterday, but not a cloud in sight much of both days, and we’re supposed to enjoy this weather most of the coming week. I’ve had the windows open all afternoon and evening, so the cats are enjoying climbing the screens as they chase after the birds nesting in my eaves, and the mild breezes have set up a wind-tunnel effect in my east-to-west–aligned townhouse, which means I need to dig the doorstops out again. There’s nothing more disconcerting than the sound of bedroom doors slamming shut at random, particularly after I’ve just creeped myself out by watching a trailer for some ghost-story movie.

yargh.


Discussion of the (theoretical) real risk of arsenic in Seattle public schools’ drinking water

After the jump, a Seattle Times article on the risk associated with (very) slightly elevated levels of arsenic detected in the drinking water in five Seattle schools late last month.

I’ve followed this because I work in an environmental laboratory. It’s fascinating to see the story evolve from the perspective of an entity involved in similar processes.

Full story content below.

Continue reading "Discussion of the (theoretical) real risk of arsenic in Seattle public schools’ drinking water" »


Links for 2006-05-07


Links for 2006-05-05


Only one person

I was about 10 minutes away from leaving work at 17:30. I had just emailed my staff and the project managers to inform them of some upcoming PTO time I’ve scheduled and was writing the upcoming dates on the whiteboard-style dry-erase calendar we keep in the PMs’ work area.

“Uh... Don?” Kristine, my data-package employee, said as she approached me at the calendar. Her voice had this slight note of urgency, like I was bleeding profusely from the ears or perhaps a hand grenade was about to explode behind me.

But my first thought was, She thinks I’m defacing the PMs’ calendar.

“Yes?” I replied as I turned to face her so I could start explaining that I was writing my time-off dates down.

She was staring down toward the floor as she walked up to me: “What’s up with your shoes?”

She was the only person to notice and say anything about it, and not until I was just about to leave for the day.

Maybe I should convert those two pairs of shoes into a rotating set of four pairs, eh?


Links for 2006-05-04


The Brewers Guild IS putting on a Summer Brewfest this year

Based on Bold Hat Productions’ announcement earlier this week, I’d assumed there would be no big summer brewfest at all this year, but it seems the Washington Brewers Guild is planning a brewfest event for Father’s Day weekend 2006 after all.

Related linkery:


The Brewers Guild IS putting on a Summer Brewfest this year

Based on Bold Hat Productions’ announcement earlier this week, I’d assumed there would be no big summer brewfest at all this year, but it seems the Washington Brewers Guild is planning a brewfest event for Father’s Day weekend 2006 after all.

Related linkery:


Hmm, disappointing

Received this notice in my email this afternoon. I’d emailed them a couple weeks ago because the web site hadn’t been updated to reflect this year’s days and dates; I see now why that was. I added some links, corrected typos, etc., where I deemed necessary.

From: Phil, Bold Hat Productions
Subject: Brew mail: Cancellation of the Summer Brewfest
Date: May 01, 2006 12:16:27 PDT
To: Brew Mail

Bold Hat Festivals and Events Announces the Cancellation of the Summer Brewfest

Dear Brew Mail:

On behalf of the entire team at Bold Hat Festivals and Events, we are announcing the cancellation of the Summer Microbrew Festival held at St. Edward State Park in Kenmore on Father’s Day weekend.

Over the past seven years, we have toasted the arrival of summer at the Summer Brewfest, so naturally we are sad to no longer produce this unique Father’s Day weekend event. We would like to thank all of you for making this event not just a glass of beer in the park, but a community celebration of summer, craft beer and Father’s Day. Thanks to the hard work and support of numerous people, the Summer Brewfest will be remembered as a beloved Northwest tradition.

Although Bold Hat remains committed to the promotion of handcrafted Washington microbrews at events such as the Fremont Oktoberfest and Hops on Equinox, the company is shifting its focus toward charitable community events. For this reason, the Summer Brewfest will no longer join Bold Hat’s roster of events. In the past year, the natural progression of the business has shifted towards charity fundraisers such as The Moyer Foundation’s Dream Catcher Auction and SBRI’s Passport to Global Health dinner. Bold Hat looks forward to enriching the community through this new arena of events.

“Bold Hat provided event coordination services for both of these events, raising over 1.5 million dollars for local and global change. These events fit with Bold Hat’s true business mission and we are energized to produce other charitable and corporate events like these,” says Phil Megenhardt, president of the Bold Hat Festivals and Events.

More details about Moyer Foundation’s Dream Catchers and SBRI’s Passport to Global Health Celebration.

Will there be other charitable non-profit Microbrew Festivals to fill the glass?
Yes. There are many festivals throughout the year where you can help out a good cause by sampling handcrafted microbrews

Fremont Oktoberfest: Fremont Chamber of Commerce will raise their steins at the 10th annual Fremont Oktoberfest Sept 22-24. Named one of the top ten Oktoberfests in the world by USA Today.

Hops on Equinox: NW Folklife’s Hops on Equinox showcases the finest of seasonal beers along with pub food and a Scotch Tasting Garden in March.

Phinney Neighborhood Association: The PNA will be hosting a Summer Beer Festival July 22nd to bookend to their winter beer festival. Phinney Center events listing.

Industry beer tasting: Washington Brewer’s Festival
Bold Hat wishes the Washington Brewers Guild the best in continuing the strong past of the Summer Brewfest as they look to their bright future building their new event. When Bold Hat decided to relinquish the event, they offered the rights to the Summer Brewfest grounds at St. Edwards State Park, to the Washington Brewer’s Guild, who declined, with the intention of starting a new urban event at the Seattle Center on Father’s Day weekend. George Hancock, President of the Guild, said, “There is no reason why the WBG cannot grow to be a major event on the annual brewer’s calendar. We have an enormous market in the Puget Sound Area, and the Seattle Center has the advantage of being centrally located with all the facilities that a large event needs—note the success of Northwest Folklife, Bumbershoot and Bite of Seattle”.

Cheers!

Whether you’ve been a Summer Brewfest fan for one year or seven, we want to thank you again for letting us be part of your Summer and Father’s Day tradition.

For more information, please contact Phil Megenhardt, president of Bold Hat Festival and Events, at 206-633-0422 or phil (at) boldhatproductions (dot) com.


Phil Megenhardt
Bold Hat Festivals and Events

Hmm, disappointing

Received this notice in my email this afternoon. I’d emailed them a couple weeks ago because the web site hadn’t been updated to reflect this year’s days and dates; I see now why that was. I added some links, corrected typos, etc., where I deemed necessary.

From: Phil, Bold Hat Productions
Subject: Brew mail: Cancellation of the Summer Brewfest
Date: May 01, 2006 12:16:27 PDT
To: Brew Mail

Bold Hat Festivals and Events Announces the Cancellation of the Summer Brewfest

Dear Brew Mail:

On behalf of the entire team at Bold Hat Festivals and Events, we are announcing the cancellation of the Summer Microbrew Festival held at St. Edward State Park in Kenmore on Father’s Day weekend.

Over the past seven years, we have toasted the arrival of summer at the Summer Brewfest, so naturally we are sad to no longer produce this unique Father’s Day weekend event. We would like to thank all of you for making this event not just a glass of beer in the park, but a community celebration of summer, craft beer and Father’s Day. Thanks to the hard work and support of numerous people, the Summer Brewfest will be remembered as a beloved Northwest tradition.

Although Bold Hat remains committed to the promotion of handcrafted Washington microbrews at events such as the Fremont Oktoberfest and Hops on Equinox, the company is shifting its focus toward charitable community events. For this reason, the Summer Brewfest will no longer join Bold Hat’s roster of events. In the past year, the natural progression of the business has shifted towards charity fundraisers such as The Moyer Foundation’s Dream Catcher Auction and SBRI’s Passport to Global Health dinner. Bold Hat looks forward to enriching the community through this new arena of events.

“Bold Hat provided event coordination services for both of these events, raising over 1.5 million dollars for local and global change. These events fit with Bold Hat’s true business mission and we are energized to produce other charitable and corporate events like these,” says Phil Megenhardt, president of the Bold Hat Festivals and Events.

More details about Moyer Foundation’s Dream Catchers and SBRI’s Passport to Global Health Celebration.

Will there be other charitable non-profit Microbrew Festivals to fill the glass?
Yes. There are many festivals throughout the year where you can help out a good cause by sampling handcrafted microbrews

Fremont Oktoberfest: Fremont Chamber of Commerce will raise their steins at the 10th annual Fremont Oktoberfest Sept 22-24. Named one of the top ten Oktoberfests in the world by USA Today.

Hops on Equinox: NW Folklife’s Hops on Equinox showcases the finest of seasonal beers along with pub food and a Scotch Tasting Garden in March.

Phinney Neighborhood Association: The PNA will be hosting a Summer Beer Festival July 22nd to bookend to their winter beer festival. Phinney Center events listing.

Industry beer tasting: Washington Brewer’s Festival
Bold Hat wishes the Washington Brewers Guild the best in continuing the strong past of the Summer Brewfest as they look to their bright future building their new event. When Bold Hat decided to relinquish the event, they offered the rights to the Summer Brewfest grounds at St. Edwards State Park, to the Washington Brewer’s Guild, who declined, with the intention of starting a new urban event at the Seattle Center on Father’s Day weekend. George Hancock, President of the Guild, said, “There is no reason why the WBG cannot grow to be a major event on the annual brewer’s calendar. We have an enormous market in the Puget Sound Area, and the Seattle Center has the advantage of being centrally located with all the facilities that a large event needs—note the success of Northwest Folklife, Bumbershoot and Bite of Seattle”.

Cheers!

Whether you’ve been a Summer Brewfest fan for one year or seven, we want to thank you again for letting us be part of your Summer and Father’s Day tradition.

For more information, please contact Phil Megenhardt, president of Bold Hat Festival and Events, at 206-633-0422 or phil (at) boldhatproductions (dot) com.


Phil Megenhardt
Bold Hat Festivals and Events

A milestone, of sorts

I drove home from dinner at Julie Anne’s with the low-fuel light illuminated the whole way. Normally I make my way to a filling station pretty quickly when the light goes on, but I was dead tired and wanted to get home right away. And there was no way in hell I was going to pay the extra 15 to 20 cents per gallon at the stations I passed on Mercer heading toward the on-ramp to northbound I-5. My Escape’s owner’s manual doesn’t state clearly how much fuel I have left when the low-fuel light goes on, so it was a bit of a gamble when I set out on the nearly-22-mile drive with the little gas-pump light shining merrily back at me from the dashboard.

Made it no trouble; I imagine like my Saturn, the light illuminates when the tank has a couple gallons remaining, which would be 50 or so miles at my usual mileage rates.

So I knew I’d have to stop this morning to fill the tank on my way to work, and I chose the little 76/Circle K just down the road from the Mill Creek post office (I had to drop off some outgoing mail anyway). I was pleased to see the 76 station’s stuck to their bargain price of $2.999/gallon—I’ve yet to pay $3.00/gallon in this latest round of Fuel Price Insanity, that hundredth-of-a-cent savings is all-important.

However, because the tank was so low, for the first time I also paid more than $40 for a full tank, which fact cheesed me off by itself. Throw in the blink-of-an-eye weekends lately, and I’m just annoyed at the world.